Tag Archives: Christian novel

Update: My Crossover Novel

A sunspot viewed close-up in ultraviolet light...
A sunspot viewed close-up in ultraviolet light, taken by the TRACE spacecraft (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Anomaly is at 30,540 words. My Word Weavers critique group and a friend are both critiquing the novel.

Working Elevator Pitch: More is falling a part than this man and woman’s marriage as massive sun spots cause displacement in the atmosphere.

It’s looking to be about 70,000 words with a firm deadline of December. It’s a crossover speculative fiction which means, that while the two main characters are not believers, there are believers here and there. The Christian believers are not there to spread the message, but to create a real world scenario of mixed families filled with believers and agnostic or atheists which can naturally create tension. In the meantime, my two characters struggle to not only figure out what is left to rebuild their marriage on, but why people are disappearing. Between flickering cell phone signals, rolling blackouts, and people disappearing, my two characters will be forced to make a decision that will affect the rest of their lives.

I am outlining a new novel to begin in January that is more horrific, but in the speculative Christian fiction genre. In this one, I will be having a message of redemption in it that is typical of Christian writing, but not preachy. I hate preachy writing. You’d know this if you read some of my book reviews. Let me clarify.

When I say message of redemption, I mean where there are shortcomings, repentance happens. Where there is hurt, forgiveness occurs. It is horror, but it will have a romantic note. The characters are saved and some are not saved. I’m going to be writing it like a ticking time bomb. Firm deadline for this new novel will be December, 2014. By January, 2014, I will have two complete novels to shop: The Rose Door and The Anomaly.

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My Novel: Should I? Or Shouldn’t I?

The Rose Door is complete. I am shopping it around for an agent and/or publisher.

Elevator Pitch: A college drop-out has to fight a witch and reclaim her rightful place in another world.

In my second novel, I am over 16,000 words into The Anomaly. The Anomaly is a cross-over speculative Christian fiction. Someone defined crossover for me as having a Christian character that directly relates to the plot of the novel, but the beliefs of the Christian character are not necessary to the story. One Christian character is in the story for part of the novel. No Salvation message. No redemption. Any message would be barely a whisper, realistic when a Christian talks to a secular person or when a non-believer lives in a family of believers. My target audience is mostly secular; in fact, you might even call it edgy. It’s my first science fiction novel. The elevator pitch is still being worked out.

Because my novel is edgy and the two main characters are unsaved and rough, I have been struggling how realistic to make it. Characters of this worldview aren’t people appalled by a little swearing. While there’s no redemption story in this novel, let’s just say by the end of the novel they will be headed in the right direction. In this story, I am exploring emotional and physical affairs, how they begin, and how this married couple grew a part. The two people in the story represent the culture. The economy plays a part in this novel, meant to encourage those who struggle. I based this story on a Yahoo article I read a couple of years ago when scientists warned the populace that sunspots or sun storms will disrupt wireless and electronic communications. I wondered what would happen if the atmospheric disruptions caused time displacement as the storms increased in size? People are disappearing little by little.

The main plot is the marriage issues, the affairs, and the second plot running alongside are the power outages, the disappearances, the disruptions in cable and phone services that intensify as we get near the end of the novel. Eventually, it will trap one of the main characters who will discover that the people never disappeared in the first place, but were always there, unseen, sandwiched between past and present.

So while I am shopping around The Rose Door, I am writing The Anomaly. I submitted the first chapter to my Word Weavers group for critique and it went well. One line in the first chapter caused what they called a ‘bump.’ When the husband got angry, his language should reflect his character. Should he say, damn or freakin’? Some well-placed swearing is okay, but only if they serve a purpose and not overwhelm the story. That’s where I am right now. Because it’s a crossover and I have a publisher in mind, would a crossover publisher accept a swear word or two, or should I get creative on the words? Use freakin’ or friggin? What’s your opinion?

© Copyright Nikole Hahn

2012 Reflections

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Most of us thought when 2012 rolled into 2013 that we would have a reason to celebrate. Instead, it’s four more years of a man with no interest in the American people and as crooked as a forest path. So it’s up to us to continue doing what Christians do best—dwelling in the hope of Jesus Christ, namely His return. And so many good things happened in 2012:

  • My book reviewing has increased. Groups like Penguin and DeMoss picked me up as a book reviewer.
  • Praise and Coffee in Anthem, Arizona and ACFW in Tempe asked me to speak at their groups.
  • Writing for The Soul was phenomenal in February. I took my first plane ride to Denver (sadly, alone) and was able to meet editors, agents, and fellow writers. At the first appointment, an agent asked to see a book proposal for, “The Rose Door,” a paranormal Christian fantasy. Even though it was rejected, her compliments encouraged me.
  • I started a crossover Christian speculative fiction called, The Anomaly and I am 31 pages into it with a soft deadline of six months.
  • Began the process of forging together a magazine called, The Relevant Christian, due to be launched Spring, 2013. We have a great crew of editors.
  • Dayspring’s “Incourage” twice published two of my devotions at incourage.me.
  • A devotion was accepted for Dena Dyer’s anthology, Wounded Women of the Bible, due out in 2013.
  • Mark Littleton accepted a devotion for his anthology, but due to complications the book was discontinued for now.
  • Elisabeth Bernstein of the Wall Street Journal interviewed me as part of her column, Dysfunctional Family Bingo.
  • I ran my first half marathon in September and got hooked on running. I ran 13.5 miles in 2:29 at the Tour De PeeVee and in December ran 10 miles in 1:40 at Frosty’s Run.
  • Ghost blogged for a business and earned my first paycheck.
  • Enjoyed a generous Christmas thanks be to God for His blessings.
  • Our refinance went through just in time for the fiscal cliff.
  • I also made valuable connections for future articles, including a movie preview (March).
  • Became a blogger for the Chino Valley Review.
  • A successful week-long series called, Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?, brought in great discussion. It was so good, in fact, that I gave it a permenant webpage so people can read it at their leisure.

2013 may look uncertain, but my trust is in Jesus. I forge forward planning to circulate The Rose Door while working on The Anomaly—two very different novels though both in the speculative fiction genre. What I would like to see from you is more discussion on my blogs and suggestions, too. What would you like to see in 2013? Please let me know. Every year I go through my blog and make some changes.

Your input would prove invaluable. And I love talking to you so I encourage more discussion. Don’t be afraid to be controversial. As long as we are kind and loving to each other and agree to disagree, discussion is healthy—it’s iron sharpening iron, as they say.

Book Review: The Art of My Life

The Art of My Life by Ann Lee Miller challenges the Christian reader with its sometimes explicit content. The novel thoroughly explores the relationship between Cal and Aly and Cal’s addiction to pot.

In her last novel, Kicking Eternity, Cal submitted to his addiction to pot after being rejected by Raine for someone else. Aly is angry because Cal slept with Evie, a drama queen and pot addict. Cal has spent several months in jail and in The Art of My Life he is determined to lead a straight life to earn Aly’s love. Aly is now a bank loan officer and living as a Christian. Her past reputation continues to haunt her mind and others reminders of her mistakes hurt.

To interrupt the story is the budding romance between Fish and Missy. That story was distracting. I really didn’t like Missy or Fish. Fish was truly an unpleasant character and while necessary to the storyline, I wish he didn’t have his own point of view. Other people will probably disagree. Ann did a great job in presenting each character with individual personalities and voices. That’s not an easy talent to achieve as sometimes every character no matter the inflection of voice in dialogue can sound like the author.

Ann’s novel is unique, getting into the uglier side of the life of an addict and the temptations involved in once having been sexually active. For those under sixteen years old, the novel is too explicit.

While Ann doesn’t write in the traditions of secular romance scenes, the scenes depicted do take a step past the edge where it’s too visual. I’m not sure how I feel about it since I do appreciate the struggle being illustrated there. Too often Christian novels don’t touch upon sexual temptation. To successfully, show rather than tell of the struggles a young girl might endure means getting into the dirty side of life. Ann does this, but I’m not sure I like how far she goes with it.

In the Christian world, her novel would probably be criticized because of this content and the heavy drug use illustrated, but in the secular world this would be considered tame.

I liked the flow of her last novel, but I felt the flow in The Art of My Life kept getting interrupted by Fish and Missy’s issues. I would have rather seen no point of view from Fish or Missy, and focused on Cal, Aly, and Cal’s mom and grandparents. Ann is probably going to use Missy and Fish in her next novel, if I were to hazard a guess by how much time these characters received in The Art of My Life.

The danger Aly and Cal faced towards the end of the novel escalated the conflict and the necessity of Cal getting rid of his pot addiction. Ann shows us the side of weed that most people who promote the so-called benefits of try to hide. Her writing of this story almost reflects a personal experience possibly with people who had this addiction. There’s a passion behind her words as she wrote Aly and Cal’s story. The nice thing about each chapter were the snippets of Aly’s “blog,” that give us a little more of Aly’s thoughts.

Overall, I struggled to come up with a rating for her novel and hovered between a three and four. A couple of grammar and/or typos were not distracting, but because of how well she showed pot’s addictive nature and the damaging effects it can have on families, I gave The Art of My Life four stars. The story of the weed’s dangerous effects on people and family upstaged Cal and Aly’s love story.

*Book given by author to review.

Today: Speaking at ACFW

Dear Friends,

Today I am speaking at ACFW (American Christian Fiction Writers). I would appreciate your prayers as this is my first speaking gig.

ACFW Arizona Chapter

Tempe, Arizona

Topic: What You Can Learn Through Book Reviewing

In many ways, book reviewing is a lot like critiquing a manuscript. On Saturday, June 30 from 1 – 3 p.m. Nikole Hahn will teach her method for reviewing books and show you how book reviewing will teach you to be a better writer, a better critique partner, and how reviewing can build a broader reader base for your blog and website. She will share the risks of book reviewing and what you should beware of and why you should post a bad review.

Contact: Betty Springer

http://christianwritersofthewest.weebly.com

Author, Carol Cox (Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?)

Why I Write Christian Fiction by Carol Cox

Why do I write Christian fiction? First, let me say that I don’t see myself as a writer of Christian fiction as much as a follower of Christ who happens to write fiction. That may sound like a fine distinction, but it makes a difference in the way I look at my writing.

Maybe it would be a good idea to define terms so we’re all on the same page. I can’t think of a better definition of the genre than the one developed by the founders of the Christy Award for Excellence in Christian Fiction. Since the entire statement is rather lengthy, let’s just look at a few of the points that apply to this discussion.

Christian fiction is a category of stories written by novelists whose Christian world view is woven into the fabric of the plot and character development.

 As writers, our worldview will always be reflected in our work, no matter what our background or belief system. It’s a natural outpouring of who we are, the way we think, and what we believe.

I am a Christian who believes in God’s grace and His redemptive love for humanity. Because that belief is so much a part of me, those themes permeate the books I write—not as a means of bashing readers over the head with some sort of “truth hammer,” but as a natural outpouring of who I am.

 Although this definition might seem either simplistic on the one hand or overly broad on the other, this grouping of novels is as comprehensive and as varied in age, interest, and spiritual depth as its readership.

Some people have a tendency to lump all Christian fiction—and Christian writers—together, but the sub-genres that come under the heading of Christian fiction are as widely varied as the authors themselves. And that’s the way it should be.

The Bible talks about the Body of Christ being made up of many parts, each with its own gifts and purpose. The same applies to Christian authors, each one following the writing path he or she is led to. Some books tackle gritty issues head-on, while others (like mine) tend to be lighter reads that also carry a message of truth. There’s no one-size-fits-all mold that we have to try to wedge ourselves into, and I’m grateful for that. I don’t have to try to be someone I’m not. My responsibility is simply to be faithful to do the best with the gifts I’ve been given.

Let’s look at another snippet from that definition:

 Good fiction, whether or not it is identified as Christian, will provide a memorable reading experience that captures the imagination, inspires, challenges, and educates.

That sums up what I hope to create: good fiction. My books aren’t intended as sermons or thinly-veiled tracts. Frankly, I’m turned off by stories written with an agenda at the expense of a good story, no matter who the author is. No one—including me—likes to be manipulated.

I don’t sit down to write a book with the thought that it may change a life. Transforming people’s lives is the Lord’s job, not mine. My job is to write the best story I can, and leave the results to Him. He’s the one who knows the needs of the people who will read that book and which words will meet those needs far better than I ever could.

The final part of the definition that I’ll share with you contains this wisdom:

 Because the essence of Christianity is a relationship with God, a Christian novelists’ well-conceived story will in some way, whether directly or indirectly, add insight to the reader’s understanding of life, of faith, of the Creator’s yearning over His creation.

What a challenge! There are so many stories yet to be told, each one of them an avenue that can be used to explore yet another facet of God’s timeless truths. That’s enough to keep me honing my writing skills for a lifetime.

Carol Cox: “As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.”

Note From Nikki: Yesterday, I featured a few links that critically discuss Christian fiction. Today is the last day of, “Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” Send me an email and tell me what you thought of the posts. To read more about this series and to catch up on the posts click here.

Mid-June Series Introduction: What is it About?

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13 – 20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and two nonbelievers will square off. Though I spoke with many nonbelievers, I could not get two more nonbelievers to read Christian fiction in order to participate. Some wanted to post posts to argue Christinaity instead of taking this opportunity to examine Christian fiction. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.

Posts begin tomorrow!

Need Two More

Dear Readers,

I had hoped for a balanced viewpoint on my mid-June series, “Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” The idea was to get four Christian novelists to write on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the atheist or non believer write a post on what they like and don’t like of Christian fiction.

You might wonder why an unbeliever would be reading Christian fiction. I asked that same question to myself when on Amazon I would see derisive reviews by non believers on Christian fiction. I sought out four unbelievers, but could only obtain two very gracious people to fill that slot. It was easy to get four novelists to contribute. Getting two more unbelievers proved unfruitful.

I either had unbelievers who wanted to argue Christianity and had never read Christian fiction, or some that felt my question was too vague. One seemed willing to write a post, but I haven’t heard back from him. I may still allow it if I get the post within a reasonable time.

If you’re an unbeliever and would be willing to write a 750-word post on what you like and/or don’t like about Christian fiction, please contact me at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com. You must have read or are going to read (in less than a week) a Christian fictional novel of any genre. I can make suggestions or you can go to the end of this blog to categories and read my past book reviews for suggestions.

If I can’t get two more unbelievers, then I am looking for two believers who are willing to write what they like and don’t like about Christian fiction. If you’ve had a problem with where Christian fiction is going nowadays, now is your time to be heard. Even if I get two more unbelievers, at this point if the posts you provide get written and submitted, I will still post them as I don’t usually like to waste people’s time.

Thanks to all those who have contributed to this series! Especially thank you to David and Jennifer for their time. You can read the bios and see the photos of all contributors for this series here.

Thanks, Nikole Hahn

Are You An Atheist or Humanist?

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13-20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and four nonbelievers will square off. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. I need two more. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
 
 Could this be you? I need two more nonbelievers. email me at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com
 
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. If you’re a nonbeliever, contact me to contribute at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.

Mid-June Series Introduction: Exciting News!

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13-20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and four nonbelievers will square off. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. I need two more. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
 
 Could this be you? I need two more nonbelievers. email me at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com
 
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. If you’re a nonbeliever, contact me to contribute at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.