Tag Archives: Carol Cox

Author, Carol Cox (Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?)

Why I Write Christian Fiction by Carol Cox

Why do I write Christian fiction? First, let me say that I don’t see myself as a writer of Christian fiction as much as a follower of Christ who happens to write fiction. That may sound like a fine distinction, but it makes a difference in the way I look at my writing.

Maybe it would be a good idea to define terms so we’re all on the same page. I can’t think of a better definition of the genre than the one developed by the founders of the Christy Award for Excellence in Christian Fiction. Since the entire statement is rather lengthy, let’s just look at a few of the points that apply to this discussion.

Christian fiction is a category of stories written by novelists whose Christian world view is woven into the fabric of the plot and character development.

 As writers, our worldview will always be reflected in our work, no matter what our background or belief system. It’s a natural outpouring of who we are, the way we think, and what we believe.

I am a Christian who believes in God’s grace and His redemptive love for humanity. Because that belief is so much a part of me, those themes permeate the books I write—not as a means of bashing readers over the head with some sort of “truth hammer,” but as a natural outpouring of who I am.

 Although this definition might seem either simplistic on the one hand or overly broad on the other, this grouping of novels is as comprehensive and as varied in age, interest, and spiritual depth as its readership.

Some people have a tendency to lump all Christian fiction—and Christian writers—together, but the sub-genres that come under the heading of Christian fiction are as widely varied as the authors themselves. And that’s the way it should be.

The Bible talks about the Body of Christ being made up of many parts, each with its own gifts and purpose. The same applies to Christian authors, each one following the writing path he or she is led to. Some books tackle gritty issues head-on, while others (like mine) tend to be lighter reads that also carry a message of truth. There’s no one-size-fits-all mold that we have to try to wedge ourselves into, and I’m grateful for that. I don’t have to try to be someone I’m not. My responsibility is simply to be faithful to do the best with the gifts I’ve been given.

Let’s look at another snippet from that definition:

 Good fiction, whether or not it is identified as Christian, will provide a memorable reading experience that captures the imagination, inspires, challenges, and educates.

That sums up what I hope to create: good fiction. My books aren’t intended as sermons or thinly-veiled tracts. Frankly, I’m turned off by stories written with an agenda at the expense of a good story, no matter who the author is. No one—including me—likes to be manipulated.

I don’t sit down to write a book with the thought that it may change a life. Transforming people’s lives is the Lord’s job, not mine. My job is to write the best story I can, and leave the results to Him. He’s the one who knows the needs of the people who will read that book and which words will meet those needs far better than I ever could.

The final part of the definition that I’ll share with you contains this wisdom:

 Because the essence of Christianity is a relationship with God, a Christian novelists’ well-conceived story will in some way, whether directly or indirectly, add insight to the reader’s understanding of life, of faith, of the Creator’s yearning over His creation.

What a challenge! There are so many stories yet to be told, each one of them an avenue that can be used to explore yet another facet of God’s timeless truths. That’s enough to keep me honing my writing skills for a lifetime.

Carol Cox: “As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.”

Note From Nikki: Yesterday, I featured a few links that critically discuss Christian fiction. Today is the last day of, “Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” Send me an email and tell me what you thought of the posts. To read more about this series and to catch up on the posts click here.

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Mid-June Series Introduction: What is it About?

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13 – 20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and two nonbelievers will square off. Though I spoke with many nonbelievers, I could not get two more nonbelievers to read Christian fiction in order to participate. Some wanted to post posts to argue Christinaity instead of taking this opportunity to examine Christian fiction. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.

Posts begin tomorrow!

Book Review: Love in Disguise

Love in Disguise by Carol Cox brings us to the edge of believability in her story about an unlikely heroine, Ellie Moore.

Ellie worked as the assistant of a famous actress. She had big dreams and a big attitude where it concerned her acting ability. However, Ellie’s dreams slip by when a trip to Europe is cruelly taken from her by someone with an equally big ego. Jobless, Ellie searches the streets of Chicago looking for another job when she runs into two detectives from the renowned Pinkerton Agency. They eventually hire Ellie.

The Pinkertons send her across the country to Arizona where a group of silver mine owners are losing profit because of robbers. Somehow, the perpetrator always knows where the silver shipments are going or where they are hidden. The Pinkerton Detective Agency doesn’t know Ellie’s assigned partner got married and left. This leaves Ellie with only one choice in order to keep income coming in and to prove her acting abilities to the agency. In this small town of Pickford, Arizona, Ellie goes as two people. She is both Lavinia, an aging woman and Lavinia’s young niece, Jessie.

This of course creates a Superman problem. Like Clark Kent and Superman was never in the same place at the same time so Ellie must work her make-up and costume magic in order to keep a small town from knowing that she is a Pinkerton Agent.

Steven Pierce, one of the mine owners, thinks the Pinkerton Agency hasn’t sent anyone. He begins to fall in love with Jessie. No one knows who is feeding the robbers information, but as we get closer to the end Carol creates fascinating tensions between Ellie and Steven as well as bringing about humorous situations. The problem, of course, in the story is how Ellie is able with what was available back then make a convincing older woman?

When I have gone to see theater, it was always obvious to me with what they have available now that the person is wearing layers of make-up to appear older. The heavy lines across a young face are only convincing in my opinion when bright lights and dark theaters accompany it. In daylight, I wonder about how this situation could be possible or even realistic? Also, the end left me hoping for a sequel because of all the story threads Carol has put in the novel. She has brought Pickford, Arizona alive.

Although, I had a problem with the believability, I appreciate the difficulty of putting together this Superman meets Agatha Christie novel. Carol managed to make me believe it was possible for a younger woman to look older and brought about the emotions typical of a good happily ever after story. Carol is well-versed in Arizona history and her research comes through quite realistically. I gave this novel five stars.

*Book given by author to review.

Are You An Atheist or Humanist?

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13-20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and four nonbelievers will square off. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. I need two more. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
 
 Could this be you? I need two more nonbelievers. email me at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com
 
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. If you’re a nonbeliever, contact me to contribute at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.

Mid-June Series Introduction: Exciting News!

Dear Readers,

“Christian Fiction: Is It Effective?” will post from June 13-20. I have come across blog posts like She Reads or Mike Duran or even A Christian Worldview that have discussed the effectiveness of Christian fiction.

In my opinion, Christian fiction is created for Christians. How can it be effective if it’s in the Christian genre? Some unbelievers feel intense anger towards the genre and won’t give it a second look. Some Amazon reviews show this anger with comments like the genre being ‘religous,’ or, ‘deceiving’ because they ‘didn’t know’ it was of the Christian genre. Some wonder if there isn’t a plan to simply eradicate Christianity from literature by sabotaging Christian fiction via reviews. So what do nonbelievers think of Christian fiction?

In this series, four Christian novelists and four nonbelievers will square off. This is not a debate about Christianity. The Christian novelists will write a 750-word blog post on why they write Christian fiction and how they intend to reach the unbeliever, while the nonbeliever will write a 750-word blog post about what they like or don’t like about Christian fiction, citing examples and being specific.

Comments will be moderated that week to ensure the discussion stays honest and friendly. I don’t care where the conversation goes, as long as we treat each other like humanbeings.

I only have two nonbelievers who have contributed. They have done an excellent job in answering my question. I need two more. Here are their bios and photos:

David Rosman is an award winning author, columnist and educator. You can read his weekly essays in the Columbia Missourian, and on InkandVoice.com/editorials. He is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Originally from the New York City metro-area, having lived in Denver, Colorado for 25-years, five-months and 22-days (but who was counting), David now resides in the middle of Middle-America, Columbia, Missouri.

David is faculty of Communication at Columbia College and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer (CCBW) of InkandVoice Communication, providing communication consulting and editing services for business, political campaigns, and not-for-profits. He is the winner of the Interactive Media Council’s award for political web site design, writing and editing, and has been twice nominated for the Kulp-Wright awards for training and academic textbook and classroom excellence.

David’s most recent book is A Christian Nation?: An examination of Christian nation theories and proofs, and is available through Amazon.com in paperback or eBook formats.

 He also writes: “I am a member of the Columbia Atheists Association (American Atheists). At 13, after my Bar Mitzvah, I wanted to become a Cantor and ended up at St. Louis University’s Parks College of Engineering, a Jesuit institution, where I was required to take all of the religion courses. There was a failed baptism in the Ohio River on my 25 birthday, and I was on the Board of Directors of two Temples before I discovered that I never really believed in God since I discovered quantum mechanics, evolution, and critical thinking.”
 
Hello, my name is Jennifer. I am the author of:
I’m about to publish a book on bullying called The Bully Vaccine: http://thebullyvaccine.com which will be out early May 2012. I write a freelance column about Humanism for the Bradenton Herald newspaper and yes, I am interested in syndicating it. I am also the Tampa Humanist and Freethought Examiner for Examiner.com and I publish the Happiness through Humanism blog and podcast. Finally, I am a speaker specializing in Humanism, ethics, morality and what motivates us to be better humans. I’m on the web at: http://www.jen-hancock.com
 
 Could this be you? I need two more nonbelievers. email me at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com
 
Christian Novelists:

Tricia Goyer is the author of thirty books including Songbird Under a German Moon, The Swiss Courier, and the mommy memoir, Blue Like Play Dough. She won Historical Novel of the Year in 2005 and 2006 from ACFW, and was honored with the Writer of the Year award from Mt. Hermon Writer’s Conference in 2003. Tricia’s book Life Interrupted was a finalist for the Gold Medallion in 2005. In addition to her novels, Tricia writes non-fiction books and magazine articles for publications like MomSense and Thriving Family. Tricia is a regular speaker at conventions and conferences, and has been a workshop presenter at the MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) International Conventions. She and her family make their home in Little Rock, Arkansas where they are part of the ministry of FamilyLife.

Carol Cox: If you’re a lover of history, mystery, and romance, you’ve come to the right place—a place where time pauses beneath brilliant Arizona skies.

As a third-generation Arizonan, I have a special love for the Southwest and its history. Life in the Old West was never easy, but the American Frontier had a way of drawing people who were resilient, who met adversity with a quiet inner strength and a reliance on God’s provision. From the deserts to the canyons to the towering pine forests, the history of my home state is filled with tales of characters whose courage and tenacity helped shape this part of the country.

I grew up listening to stories about people like this. Men and women who possessed the qualities needed to meet the challenges of this rugged land. Men and women who experienced their share of laughter and tears while taming the Southwest . . . and learning something about themselves and their relationship with God along the way. These are the kind of men and women who inspire the books I write.

Dianne Christner lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where life sizzles, at least in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Before writing, Dianne balanced a career of office management with raising a family and serving the Lord in her local church.

 She has been married for thirty-nine years. Dianne and Jim have two married children, Mike and Rachel, and five grandchildren. With several historical fictions to her credit, she hopes you enjoy her new contemporary series – The Plain City Bridesmaids. If you want to learn more about Dianne’s writing and personal life, visit her blog. She loves interacting with her readers.

C. S. Lakin is novelist and writing coach who spends her time divided between developing new book ideas and helping writers polish theirs. She is the author of twelve novels – six contemporary novels and six in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Whether she is exploring the depths of the human psyche and pushing her characters to the edge of desperation, or embellishing an imaginary world replete with talking pigs and ancient magical curses, she is doing what she loves best – using her creativity and skills to inspire and affect her readers.

Please join us that week. If you’re a nonbeliever, contact me to contribute at nikolehahn@thehahnhuntinglodge.com. This is your opportunity to share your views. Feel free to ask questions.

Readers: Will you join us on that day and share your opinion after each post? You can subscribe to my posts so it comes to your email.

Season of Life: Spring – Validation

Spring forest near Planina (Slovenia, 2008)
Image via Wikipedia

The word, “significance” seemed to pop from the page. Growing up, I have never felt significant or validated. In fact, for a moment, especially after driving through an old neighborhood before attending my Writer’s Group, I held the word, “significance,” in my mind. We all want validation; some of us more than others. Recognition for work well done, praise from friends, and accolades are wonderful, and yet this can seriously cause problems if we focus only on validation and seek it more aggressively from everyone but God. Then, comes guilt because we have displeased them.

It’s easy to cause guilt when people are not happy with me, or I say ‘no’ to something. I admit that I am a people pleaser. I know where this comes from. Growing up and wanting love and approval doesn’t completely go away even though you have love and approval around you. Friends surround me. I have a great husband. I am loved. But try telling my mind this when someone disagrees with me or someone says something in argument against a decision I make.

It’s born from the desire to prove to everyone that I am not stupid. I am not a failure. I am someone. I am capable. It’s significance. Still, I look for significance everywhere in people and yet struggle to accept that I am significant in Christ Jesus. He made me significant. He loves me. That should be enough, but many times my sinful mind wanders, looking, probing for validation in friendships. That always sends me to unhappy places. I am happiest when I am content in being significant in Christ.

So while I surf the internet, create friendships online and Facebook and Tweet, I remind myself of whom I am in Christ. I remind myself that how people view me is not as important as how Christ views me. Maybe one day I will be a J.K. Rowling or a Carol Cox or a Patti Lacy, but for now I am content in knowing that I am loved by the One who went to the cross for me. No matter where my writing career goes (or doesn’t go) I am where God wants me to be and I am more loved now than ever in my life. I am significant and God validates me.

Describe why you are a people pleaser.  What season of life does this bring you to (Fall, Winter, Summer, or Spring)?

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