Tag Archives: author

Favorite Reads: The Butterfly Effect By Andy Andrews

 

To buy this book, click on the link:

The Butterfly Effect: How Your Life Matters

The book was an unexpected delight and at the same time unexpectedly short. I’m all ready wanting to buy this book for my nephew. It’s inspirational showing the effects of small, every day people who chose to do the right thing and in turn their actions saved lives in future generations. One man’s actions saved our country. I don’t think people realize how every action is important from the conversation you had with a woman at the grocery store to life decisions you make. Your action has a reaction. This book shows how God designed each of us for a purpose, and when you look at the whole picture it is amazing to see how the dominoes fall.

The Butterfly Effect begins like a history lesson, but reads like a novel. I would encourage you not to skip over the Author’s Note. It is very interesting. Give it away to someone who needs to see that their life matters. So much of the time we go through every day without realizing our value in God’s eyes. We are much more than just a grocery store clerk, a government employee, an IRS man, or a custodian. Won’t you spread your wings and beat the air and take a chance on life?

Disclosure of material connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase this item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I might use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255, “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” Book given by publisher to review. This is a repost.

 

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Guest Post: Why We Need Supernatural Fiction

By Mike Duran

America is incurably spiritual. Polls continually reveal that the majority of U.S. citizens have some belief in God, angels, heaven, hell and the devil. Fox News, reporting on a national poll conducted by Opinion Dynamics Corporation, put an interesting spin on these stats. For instance, more men believe in UFOs than women (39 percent to 30 percent), and Democrats are more likely than Republicans to believe in reincarnation, astrology and ghosts. In another poll, American Atheists, Inc. found that one in five Americans claims to have been visited by an angel. The same poll gives us this helpful statistical tidbit: “Income was another factor affecting responses. Eighty-three percent of those earning below $25,000 per year believed in angelic beings, while those earning over $80,000 were less likely (64 percent) to do so.” In other words, the further you get from the poverty line, the less you need to be touched by an angel.

Suffice to say that we are fascinated by—if not downright favorable toward—the supernatural. UFOs, psychic phenomenon, ghosts and angels are practically American staples.

Hollywood knows this. For instance, of the 50 highest-grossing movies of all-time, more than half contain speculative and supernatural themes. Films like The Sixth Sense, The Dark Knight, The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Spider Man, seem to capture something about the American zeitgeist. The box office is a great barometer of our fascination for spiritual things. Movies like The Rite, Hereafter, Paranormal Activity, Legion, The Last Exorcism, and Ghost, are ever-present reminders of our belief that “something” is out there.

This trend is not limited to Tinseltown. In literature, Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight epic and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series have sold gazillions of copies. Recently, on the NY Times’ bestseller list, you could find such books as Angelology, Paranormalcy, and A Discovery of Witches.

Point is: Pop culture is a reflection of our fascination, however skewed it might be, with the supernatural. What often gets lost in the statistics and commercialism is the implication of it all. I mean, what does it say about us that we are so interested in invisible entities and dwellers of exotic worlds? Are we escapists, dreamers or just plain primitives?

C.S. Lewis argued that the hunger for heaven is evidence for the existence of heaven. In other words, all cravings have a correspondent fix. Like a missing puzzle piece, we instinctively seek the “shape” that will complete us. Likewise, our unshakeable, intuitive sense that powers greater than ours lurk on the fringes of the everyday, may be the best evidence of their existence. Of course, believing in ghosts or extra-terrestrials does not make them so. Nevertheless, it is the consistent hunger for a “superior mind” and a perfect world that we can’t seem to shake.

Frederick Buechner tells the story of the young man who shot and killed his father in a fit of rage. Later that evening in his prison cell, the boy was heard crying, “I need my Dad. I need my Dad.” It’s very likely that what is going bump in the night is our eternal longings flailing against the void; we’ve evicted God, and we miss Him. America’s hunger for the supernatural is evidence of this spiritual vacuum.

Some theologians have called this the echo of Eden: the spiritual ripples of a world that once was. Because of it, we can’t stand at a graveside without asking where the departed went. We can’t look to the skies without asking if there’s anybody out there. The unseen realm resonates in us, because we are part of it; it is our home away from home.

In his work, True Spirituality, Francis Schaeffer said, “The Christian life means living in the two halves of reality: the supernatural and the natural parts.” Demons and angels are real—not just for those who make less than 80K a year. As Christians, we should seek to affirm and reclaim this invisible realm, live in both halves of it.

Writing Supernatural Fiction is one of the ways I try to do that.

This is a part of a three-day blog tour for his debut book, The Resurrection. You can visit his blog here.

An Interview With Rook Publishing

As a member of Word Weavers International (Northern Arizona Chapter), I discovered this two-year old publishing company through one of our members. As a writer, I had some questions. Sean Thompson of Rook Publishing granted me an interview.

rook publishing

NH: Why did you start Rook Publishing?

ST: Rook Publishing, a traditional print and digital publisher, was started by Sean and Michelle Thompson in mid 2011. It was started out of the desire to publish novels in a more author friendly manner. Michelle had three books previously published in the traditional manner and was used to dealing with the inequalities inherent in these traditional companies. These companies’ standard publishing practices include: limited 10-15% royalties, unbalanced contract conditions, and a lack of general communication between the publisher and the author. Together, Sean and Michelle decided that they could not only do better with the novels of close friends and acquaintances, but in the long-term, set the bar higher for publishing around the world.

NH: Describe your team and past publishing experience.

ST: Two years down the road, we have put together an exceptional team with education and experience in graphic design, journalism, layout, writing, editing, law, and marketing. Our team is ready to revolutionize the publishing industry by providing the author-friendly terms and services not available through other traditional publishers. We believe that our unprecedented policies and services will not only benefit the author more, but the success of their books as well. This is the foundation of what should be the relationship between the author and their publisher.

NH: How thorough are you in the editing and publication process?

ST: Editing is paramount to the flow and consistency of a manuscript. We recommend that potential Rook Publishing authors have their manuscript edited by a professional editor – or at least by a friend or family member before it is submitted. It is almost impossible to edit one’s own work with the amount of objective detail needed to ensure its success. It just makes sense to submit your work in the best light possible. This increases the chance that our acquisitions editors will be excited about accepting and publishing your book. It also streamlines the publishing process so that our editors can focus on the items that will make your book successful.

NH: How will the covers be designed?

ST: A book cover is a book’s first introduction to potential readers, and therefore crucial to a book’s success. Our graphic design team has over 20 years experience in digital and print visual arts. They focus on creating notable book covers appropriate to each individual book, genre, and audience. Our graphic designers are an essential part of our team and work hand-in-hand with our editors to make sure they capture the essence of the book through its cover.

NH: Any last thoughts?

ST: Though we are a small company, we are currently in the process of publishing four manuscripts and are reviewing and considering several others. We are excited as we take our company to the next level by putting into practice what we have carefully engineered: revolutionizing the publishing process, while making author’s dreams come true. Please check out our website for more information: www.rookpublishing.com. We look forward to reading your manuscript!

Book Review: This Beautiful Mess

*If you buy this book from Amazon, you’ll be helping me out. Click at the link after this sentence: This Beautiful Mess: Practicing the Presence of the Kingdom of God

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This Beautiful Mess by Rick McKinley mixes art with his purpose of changing our thinking from living as we wait for the Kingdom to living in the Kingdom. However, I left this book with mixed feelings.

The book begins very slowly. I put it down several times because I expected more meat, less dessert. It reads like many of the blogs I read online—beautiful, poetic, and Rick McKinley is quite a writer. The book is separated into parts. Some of the chapters include excerpts or what looks like poetry; an expression of worship, like dipping a banana in chocolate to make someone swallow the truth more pleasantly. What would be worship without beauty? God is, afterall, an artist, too. This Beautiful Mess gets into the truth, the meat, and my mind is satisfied, hungrily devouring every word.

This Beautiful Mess was written by an author who lives in liberal Portland. Naturally, one would expect a bit of leftist ideology in it. The author uses the word “rape” when referring to the environment in two places in the book, repeating himself.

“On the one hand, I see some evangelical communities and traditions that camp on the not-yet-end of the truth of the kingdom. They tend to look away from the disadvantaged, from issues of injustice or raping of the natural world for profit because…,” or here, “…understanding that creation was given to us to serve us. That doesn’t mean we’re free to rape the earth…” While the author stays vague so you’re not entirely sure how far left he thinks in regarding to environmental politics, it puts a conservative like me on alert. While I agree with taking care of the environment, I don’t agree with the more extreme environmentalists. With no specific examples, there’s too much room for assumption. He also has some black and white claims when comparing liberal and conservative churches.

At the 85% point of the book, he says the culture listens less because, “Jesus is not being lived out in the mess of their (conservative churches) lives. Christians are simply saying that Jesus is King without also living out His reign in the streets.” I attend a conservative church. We have two very large programs that take care of the disadvantaged in our community. Our church also did a 90 Days of Blessings to encourage our congregation to reach out beyond the walls of our church. To be fair, he also touches on the liberal church in the next paragraph. He devotes a large portion of the book to emotionalism and social justice.

This Beautiful Mess goes on about social justice, but, unless I missed it, I saw no change in the people who were warmed in the streets or who received free meals via many camp stoves. He praises a man who inherited $20,000 and gave it all way on Wall Street in small bills. I wonder what could have been done with that amount to double or triple his investment to do more good than a few dollars to temporarily help someone in need? In location 1988-1990, the author quotes Mother Theresa:

“My actions will preach. ‘There should be less talk; a preaching point is not a meeting point,’ said Mother Teresa. ‘What do you do then? Take a broom and clean someone’s house. That says enough.’” This is where I disagree. We have too much of this in the world and not enough truth balancing out the action. Even the secular people do kind things for others, but what makes Christians different than the culture? People are hungry for love and for truth, even if truth hurts, and we need both. I did see change in the single parent stories. I agreed with him about repentance and how much we all need it (in and out of church). I agreed with much of his Appendix.

Normally, I don’t read Appendix’s, but the author’s Appendix is basically a proposal to the church on how to reach a culture without compromising beliefs. The author says, “This may be the biggest stretch for many of us, because discipleship has tended to focus on matters of being part of the church while mission has been left to those going overseas.” People are a wreck in and out of the church. This Beautiful Mess, while too much fluff at times, beautifully illustrated how redemption through Christ is a spiritual miracle and it must be done through relationship, not rote; through repentance. I gave this book three stars.

*Book given by publisher to review.

An Interview With Rook Publishing

As a member of Word Weavers International (Northern Arizona Chapter), I discovered this two-year old publishing company through one of our members. As a writer, I had some questions. Sean Thompson of Rook Publishing granted me an interview.

rook publishing

NH: Why did you start Rook Publishing?

ST: Rook Publishing, a traditional print and digital publisher, was started by Sean and Michelle Thompson in mid 2011. It was started out of the desire to publish novels in a more author friendly manner. Michelle had three books previously published in the traditional manner and was used to dealing with the inequalities inherent in these traditional companies. These companies’ standard publishing practices include: limited 10-15% royalties, unbalanced contract conditions, and a lack of general communication between the publisher and the author. Together, Sean and Michelle decided that they could not only do better with the novels of close friends and acquaintances, but in the long-term, set the bar higher for publishing around the world.

NH: Describe your team and past publishing experience.

ST: Two years down the road, we have put together an exceptional team with education and experience in graphic design, journalism, layout, writing, editing, law, and marketing. Our team is ready to revolutionize the publishing industry by providing the author-friendly terms and services not available through other traditional publishers. We believe that our unprecedented policies and services will not only benefit the author more, but the success of their books as well. This is the foundation of what should be the relationship between the author and their publisher.

NH: How thorough are you in the editing and publication process?

ST: Editing is paramount to the flow and consistency of a manuscript. We recommend that potential Rook Publishing authors have their manuscript edited by a professional editor – or at least by a friend or family member before it is submitted. It is almost impossible to edit one’s own work with the amount of objective detail needed to ensure its success. It just makes sense to submit your work in the best light possible. This increases the chance that our acquisitions editors will be excited about accepting and publishing your book. It also streamlines the publishing process so that our editors can focus on the items that will make your book successful.

NH: How will the covers be designed?

ST: A book cover is a book’s first introduction to potential readers, and therefore crucial to a book’s success. Our graphic design team has over 20 years experience in digital and print visual arts. They focus on creating notable book covers appropriate to each individual book, genre, and audience. Our graphic designers are an essential part of our team and work hand-in-hand with our editors to make sure they capture the essence of the book through its cover.

NH: Any last thoughts?

ST: Though we are a small company, we are currently in the process of publishing four manuscripts and are reviewing and considering several others. We are excited as we take our company to the next level by putting into practice what we have carefully engineered: revolutionizing the publishing process, while making author’s dreams come true. Please check out our website for more information: www.rookpublishing.com. We look forward to reading your manuscript!

Book Review: What Every Woman Should Know

Note to Reader: I am not reviewing this book based on biblical or historical accuracy as I am not schooled in theology nor do I have Bible Study experience to consider myself an expert. If there is anything obviously in error, I will point it out, but otherwise I leave that discernment to you. Jori Sams is the author of Revelation in Seven Weeks and  There Will Come No More Tears.  A copy of the book was given to me by the author to review as part of her blog tour. Her website is located here.

wewsk_cover

What Every Woman Should Know by Jori Sams uniquely explores gender equality in which she sets out to prove that every woman needs to know their place in God’s heart. This book is a historical and biblical expository with numerous technical errors.

First, What Every Woman Should Know is well-researched. Research demands many hours and the gift of organizing that surplus of information into readable chapters, and this deserves recognition. I felt this book explored well how women ranked in biblical history and scripture. The book begins with the patriarchal society and delves into Mosaic Law, moving us through history to present time. What gives me doubt on its accuracy has more to do with how badly edited and poorly cited this manuscript was in comparison with similar genres.

All this beautiful work deserves the time it takes for re-writes and a professional editor who can cut unnecessary words. This phrase on location 36-37 says,“Then, in a blink of an eye, she was gone as life as I know it passed from her.” Blink of an eye is a cliche. I would have said, “In the time it takes to exhale, she was gone. Life as I knew it changed.

An editor would have caught this mistake here, ¹“The result = less people speaking about it,” and fixed it to read, “The result equals less people speaking about it.”  An editor would have pointed out the necessary places to add a footnote or an end note with proper citing techniques as demonstrated above. The bibliography needed better organizing, perhaps putting the many references by chapter with the numbers referring to the exact place and context where the information was used to make it easier for a reader to delve deeper into a point. The spelling, punctuation, grammar, missing words, extraordinarily long paragraphs, and sentence structure problems were too numerous to refer to in one book review.

²At one place, I winced as the book became crude in its terminology when it read, “As the women were doing the bulk of the work, men were merely hunting or planting their seed in women.” I thought that was unnecessary (unless it was a typo). The author also had a foreword and an introduction. Either include one or the other, but not both. Chapter One didn’t begin in the first two paragraphs, but where the book read, “In reality, so much…” Of course, I would have changed it to read, “So much over the course of history has…”

The first two paragraphs in Chapter One had too many “I’s” in it, and peppered throughout the book were too many references to her frequent worldwide travels and years of experience. What bothered me towards the end of the book were the frequent put-downs of church.

We get enough of that online and through other social media where Christians put down houses of worship whether, as Frank Viola in Pagan Christianity said, the church building is unbiblical, or from the hurt I hear in people’s words. Either way, the rhetoric is getting old. While I agree with her on several points, I think repeating the same arguments causes more harm to the Christian belief. House churches and places of worship can work in tandem.

Otherwise, What Women Should Know comes off as strong and confident. This book has a great teaching style so the reader can retain more information. The author shares some insight into her testimony and shows a lot of knowledge. The Bible Study at the end of the book is a nice touch. Other technical issues existed in the book, but I chose to highlight what was important. Overall, I gave this book three stars. The editing errors disrupted what would have otherwise been a pleasant reading experience for me.

———————————

¹Location 2877

²Location 336

Why All The Sour Grapes?

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Many book reviewers have often complained how the authors or the author’s friends, fans, and relatives harrass the reviewer for portraying a book negatively. Examples of these behaviors are numerous.

C.S. Lakin gave a poor review to a bestselling author. “But this author sought me out, somehow found my e-mail address, and wrote to me. Not just once but many times. At first she was polite and friendly and tried to persuade me to remove my review. Then the letters got more demanding, hostile, and she even enlisted other author friends to threaten me (in numerous ways). I was astonished and shocked. It wasn’t so much her immaturity that got to me; it was seeing how her joy was so easily destroyed by one not-so-complimentary review.” (Writing For an Audience Can Be Dangerous; April, 2012)

Another book reviewer left a comment on Mike Duran’s site. She said, “My review elicited a private email (NOT from the author but a fan/friend/relation of hers) saying that I had just killed any chance I ever had of getting published in the CBA.” (Review. Rinse. Repeat.)

You can’t bully or threaten a better opinion. If someone doesn’t like a book, they don’t like it. Part of our responsibility as book reviewers is to tell the truth in love. It’s up to the readers to determine what books they will buy. I am happy to say even my poor reviews have helped to sell books on more than one occasion.  I’m here for the reader. You can post fluff reviews just to sell books, but as I am observing, fluff reviews are backfiring. People aren’t trusting them.

Mike Duran said in In Praise of Bad Reviews, “When it comes to book reviews, many reviewers deserve a thumbs-down. Is it because they are too harsh, too nit-picky, or too critical? On the contrary, it’s because they’re not harsh, nit-picky, and critical enough! Which is why I ignore certain reviewers — not because they pick everything apart, but because they praise everything. A reviewer who likes everything they read is either biased, dishonest, or dense. I can forgive a reviewer for liking a book I hate. I can’t forgive them for liking everything they read.” (April, 2012)

Another offender are anonymous reviews. One review on Barnes and Noble listed as anonymous raved about a particular book. The person listed the author’s age as they praised the author’s wisdom. How would they know that if they didn’t know her personally? It’s possible the author’s age might have been mentioned inside the book, but that’s not normally the case. A bio rarely includes an age. Like I said at an ACFW meeting earlier last year, bad reviews aren’t terrible. Bad reviews make a book credible. It means not all the reviews were from family or friends or fanatic fans. An epidemic of attacks against reviewers of books or products says much about our narcissistic culture. Even a best selling author turned on her reviewer.

 The Atlantic Monthly reported on August 28, 2012 about the best selling author, Emily Griffith who became upset over one bad review. Emily’s husband called the negative reviewer psycho which began a host of attacks from Griffith fans against that reviewer. Another reviewer, Corey,  saw this and changed her star rating on Amazon from four to one because of Emily’s alleged bad behavior. Emily then allegedly said that Corey changed it from a five-star review to a one star.

“It was never a five-star.” Corey writes. The attacks occurred on Amazon, email and by phone from crazed fans.Then, I received a couple of emails from an angry man about a negative review I wrote. He even switched to a false name to avoid my spam folder using a different email to call me names when he didn’t get what he wanted from me.

As I told the angry man, we are a large Body of Christ filled with many opinions and different likes and dislikes. As one comment on The Atlantic Monthly stated, at least people are talking about the book. Isn’t that the point? So why all the sour grapes?

I like how C.S. Lakin put it in Writing For an Audience Can Be Dangerous. “I learned a tremendous lesson from that encounter. Actually, a lot of lessons. One being that I never want to become like that if I ever sell big. I want to be gracious, kind, accepting, and respect others’ opinions–even if it means they hate my books.” (emphasis mine)

Unlike C.S. Lakin, I won’t take down my bad reviews. We grow through trials. In fact, because of one particular site changing their terms and removing my two-star review after it posted, I now have a book review policy. Whether it’s from a strange need as C.S. Lakin describes in Writing For an Audience Can Be Dangerous or because authors’ friends or relatives want their author to be successful, a reviewer should not be attacked in any way. Discussion is always welcome, but accusations, manipulation of the system, manipulation in the disguise of a “discussion,” name-calling, threatening, or bullying are strictly forbidden. If you are guilty of doing this, let me put it another way—your name in their mind will always be associated with that encounter. Why not let your name be linked to a positive experience instead?

More on that Friday as I share an example from years ago on why a good attitude is important. Meanwhile, tell me your story. If you are a book reviewer, what experiences have you had with book reviewing? 

Why I Don’t Write Writers Blogs

Hand in hand
Hand in hand (Photo credit: Images by John ‘K’)

Many blogs crowd the internet talking about writing. I made a decision years ago that I would avoid talking about writing unless necessary.

Too many sites talk about writing all ready. Some of them are qualified. Others are not qualified. I do my own research through agent and publisher blogs. A smattering of authors are in there, too. What makes those authors an expert in my opinion are the books they have sold over the years.

The few self-published authors I follow are great at social networking, but since my interest is in independent and traditionally published companies I keep abreast of the publishing world with the people who have the experience in it. I subscribe to Publishers Weekly and Writers Digest. I also don’t write about writing because I feel my qualifications are lacking.

I can tell you what I have learned, but you can find this same information through diligent research. I have completed one novel and am in the midst of deciding whether to continue into book 2 or write another, separate one so I have two products to market. I have never published a novel. My resume is long with publications in small presses. I ghost blog to bring in extra money.

Writing online is about creating community. That’s also why I don’t blog about writing much.

Mike Duran said in Are Writers Too Insulated From Their Readers?, “So while we debate whether an author should blog or how much to “show v. tell,”, our real audience could care less. We get lost in feverish discussions about self-publishing vs. traditional publishing, but our potential readers couldn’t give a rip. We argue “the rules,” but the general public has no idea what rules we’re talking about. We strive to make a name for ourselves in the publishing community, but “because we’re in it, and we care about it, we incorrectly assume that because writers know who I am, readers must as well.”

I love my writer friends, but also my reader friends. I love reviewing books as a writer and reader. Like twins, you can’t separate the two. With so many self-published authors trying to fluff reviews and play with their amazon ratings, I am on the side of the reader.

Like you, I can’t afford to buy much. So when I buy a book I examine the cover and the narrative on the back. Then, I read the bad reviews before I get into the good reviews. I want to know if the money and time I am investing will be worth it. And because my blog is about creating community, I want to talk about living in this world as a Christian and the inward struggles I face everyday. Then, I want to hear from my readers. I want to know what to pray for as they struggle.

With so many blogs talking about writing, the left and right politics of self-publish versus traditional, and the ever-changing publishing world, the internet doesn’t need one more writing blog.

What are your favorite writing blogs? What do you look for in a blog?

Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek series

“Today Mona Hodgson, author of the Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek series, is celebrating the release of her very first series book trailer! Enjoy this fun and beautiful video, and don’t forget to visit Mona at www.MonaHodgson.com! The final book in this series, Twice a Bride, comes out on October 2, 2012, from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.  You can join Mona’s celebration this week at http://monahodgson.wordpress.com/. Congratulations on completing this wonderful series, Mona!”

You can read a guest post by Mona here.

Book Review: The Butterfly Effect By Andy Andrews

 

Every single thing you do matters. You have been created

as one of a kind. You have been created in order to make a difference.

You have within you the power to change the world.”

A n d y A n d r e w s

The book was an unexpected delight and at the same time unexpectedly short. I’m all ready wanting to buy this book for my nephew. It’s inspirational showing the effects of small, every day people who chose to do the right thing and in turn their actions saved lives in future generations. One man’s actions saved our country. I don’t think people realize how every action is important from the conversation you had with a woman at the grocery store to life decisions you make. Your action has a reaction. This book shows how God designed each of us for a purpose, and when you look at the whole picture it is amazing to see how the dominoes fall.

The Butterfly Effect begins like a history lesson, but reads like a novel. I would encourage you not to skip over the Author’s Note. It is very interesting. Give it away to someone who needs to see that their life matters. So much of the time we go through every day without realizing our value in God’s eyes. We are much more than just a grocery store clerk, a government employee, an IRS man, or a custodian. Won’t you spread your wings and beat the air and take a chance on life?

From The Publisher: 

The decisions you make and the way you treat others have more impact than you may ever realize.

Speaker and New York Times best-selling author Andy Andrews shares a compelling and powerful story about a decision one man made over a hundred years ago, and the ripple effect it’s had on us individually, and nationwide, today. It’s a story that will inspire courage and wisdom in the decisions we make, as well as affect the way we treat others through our lifetime. Andrews speaks over 100 times a year, and The Butterfly Effect is his #1 most requested story.

Also included with the purchase of the book is a link to view a 9-minute message of Andrews telling The Butterfly Effect story to a live audience.

 Book Provided By The Publisher To Review

I review for BookSneeze