Book Review: Escaping The Cauldron (expanded edition)

“I became a Christian witch. What? Did I lose my mind or my Bible? There is no such thing as Christian witchcraft. The idea of combining the Christian faith with occult practice is ludicrous! Who would believe such a thing was even possible? Someone influenced by a postmodern society. A person hungry for spirituality without rules.” Pg. 22, Escaping the Cauldron (Charisma, 2012)

Kristine McGuire’s Impressive Rise From Self-Publishing to Traditional Publishing

On August 3, 2010 for Christian Speaker Services, I reviewed Escaping The Cauldron: What You Should Know About The Occult. At the time, Kristine McGuire self-published it via Lulu.com.

Through ingenious self-marketing techniques, Kristine managed to snag an interview on the 700 Club while her book was still contracted with Lulu. Then, Charisma House picked it up. In September, 2012, Kristine re-published an extended version of the book now called, Escaping the Cauldron: Exposing Occult Influences in Everyday Life. This, by far, is better than her first book.

Her book received a full five-star rating from me at the time. This extended version gets much deeper into the creepy details of being a witch. In the above quote, Kristine makes a good point.

What is Postmodernism?

A brand new Christian can get lost in the theological maze. Since 2002, I’ve had to self-educate myself on many terms like deist and postmodernism, too. It still confuses me at times when truth is obscured by somebody’s theology. Truth is absolute.

Postmodernism is the opposite of absolute.

“Postmodern religious systems of thought view realities as plural and subjective and dependent on the individual’s worldview. Postmodern interpretations of religion acknowledge and value a multiplicity of diverse interpretations of truth, being and ways of seeing. There is a rejection of sharp distinctions and global or dominant metanarratives in postmodern religion and this reflects one of the core principles[8] of postmodern philosophy. A postmodern interpretation of religion emphasises the key point that religious truth is highly individualistic, subjective and resides within the individual.[9](Wikipedia)

Many of the articles I read on the subject of postmodernism can be found here:

The Postmodern Crack-up by Chuck Colson (Christianity Today)

Same Words, Different Meanings by Randy Alcorn (EPM Ministries)

Ravi Zacharias on postmodernism

So now that you’re thoroughly confused, let me quote Randy Alcorn on the meaning of Postmodernism so we’re absolutely clear on its definition:

“Why? Because the word tolerant means two radically different things to you and to her. To you it means being kind and loving to people who think and act in ways you know to be wrong, according to Scripture. To the students and their teacher—and by assimilation even to your Christian teenager unless she is exceptionally well-grounded in Scripture—tolerant means believing that all ways of thinking and acting are equally valid, and NOT wrong. By believing Jesus is the only way for people to enter Heaven, you are by definition intolerant. By embracing tolerance, in the sense it is most widely used in this culture, our young people (whether or not they state it and regardless of what their church believes) are rejecting the idea that Jesus is the only way.”

The Book Review

Escaping The Cauldron’s extended version published by Charisma is rife with the smallest detail. Kristine goes into the whys and hows of being a Christian Witch. One will be able to read what attracted her to the occult and how she hid for years teaching in church while practicing witchcraft. I stand by what I said in my former review and urge you to read this. The added details affirm its truth. The supernatural is real and you do not mess with it.

She also gave me a different view-point on Yoga. While I knew it’s Hindu roots, I also knew my heart worshiped Jesus as I worked out. That being said, she enlightened me on the meaning of ‘namaste.’ It means, the worship of the divine in all of us. That made me pause. I haven’t picked up my Denise Austin Yoga DVD since then and now keep my eye open for Christian Yoga. I can’t look at namaste the same again.

Kristine also gives details on her ghost hunting and other practices. The results of which gave me chills. Since I once dabbled in the occult out of curiosity or need, I know what she said and saw was true. When she wrote in the book how dabbling in the occult has supernatural consequences later in life, I also can attest to her words. An evil stalked me at eighteen one evening. I could not see it. That’s a blog for another time. Now it makes sense. I never could explain that night.

Kristine brings out spiritual practices in church that mix eastern mediation with current Christian worship, like centering or soaking prayer. I might also add Prayer Labyrinths as it has roots in New Age.

Overall, with the ‘Digging Deeper’ questions and massive amounts of scripture, Kristine makes her case very well while sharing her testimony and revealing the occult in everyday lives. I still give this book five stars.

The Critics

Dina said here, “For them Jesus Christ and Artemis are aspects of God, to insult one is to insult the other in their belief system. Imagine how insulting such statements must be for them. It doesn’t mater if you disagree or agree with their beliefs. If you want someone to listen to your testimony, you must respect their religion regardless of what you think of it…but the love of Christ requires us to “be all things to all people”. …Paul approached a statue labeled “To The Unknown God”. He shared the Gospel with them by using that statue as an example. This can be found in Acts 17:22-23.”

I quote again what Randy Alcorn said, “To the students and their teacher—and by assimilation even to your Christian teenager unless she is exceptionally well-grounded in Scripture—tolerant means believing that all ways of thinking and acting are equally valid, and NOT wrong. By believing Jesus is the only way for people to enter Heaven, you are by definition intolerant. By embracing tolerance, in the sense it is most widely used in this culture, our young people (whether or not they state it and regardless of what their church believes) are rejecting the idea that Jesus is the only way.” (emphasis mine)

You cannot mix the Bible with occult practices or twist scripture to your own thinking. The Bible stands on its own and to add anything to the Bible means asking for greater consequences.

James 3:1 (NIV) says, “Not many of you should become teachers, my fellow believers, because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly.” This is a warning. Littered throughout the Bible are references to false teachers. Teachers are judged more harshly because of the influence they have on a group. Jesus is the only way to Salvation. Kristine’s whole book answers the critics I read online. You can be sincere and sincerely wrong as someone once pointed out to me.

One critic said Kristine sounded pretentious. The misused words and fragmented sentences the critic pointed out went unnoticed by me. Kristine did sound like an expert, but not pretentious. She spoke in her unique voice with her story. Kristine spoke with the strength of someone who suffered and doesn’t want anyone else to be deceived either. Yet another critic wanted to hear more of her personal story and less of the facts. The book does say, “Escaping The Cauldron: Exposing Occult Influences in Everyday Life.” The tagline infers the book will cover more than just her story.

One a side note, I did feel the call to Jesus should have been more toward the rear as is common in most books. I liked the glossary. For those of us not familiar with Wicca, the glossary helps.

As I have always said, a poor review will always add credence to any book or novel. There’s no reason to feel defensive about them and an author does not need to fear them. If a book always received glowing reviews, you would most likely dismiss it as fluffed by the authors friends and relatives or marketing team. It’s a great reference book.

Please leave a comment. Any comment left will be entered to win an autographed copy of Escaping the Cauldron: Exposing Occult Influences in Every Day Life. Deadline to leave a comment will be November 1 in the morning. On the evening of November 1, I will announce one winner. One entry per person. Book given by publisher to review.

Drop by tomorrow for a special Halloween guest blog by Kristine McGuire.

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9 thoughts on “Book Review: Escaping The Cauldron (expanded edition)”

  1. This is one book everyone should get, It will help christians in how to reach people who are stuck in the occult.

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