Book Review: MOMumental

First of all, I am not a mom. When I agreed to review MOMumental by Jennifer Grant, my husband said, “Well, you can’t review it from the point of view of a mom.” But MOMumental is so much more than what it seems and non-parents can enjoy it as well as new parents.

Jennifer Grant had dreams of becoming the perfect mom. Her broken childhood caused her to work hard towards making sure her children have an unmarred childhood. She spoke about idealizing a mom who lived across the street. Jennifer thought that mom was perfect until the mom told Jennifer that she wanted to race after her troubled teen son and beat him with a wooden spoon. That shocked Jennifer from her naïve views of parenthood.

MOMumental reads more like a memoir. I wouldn’t classify it as a parenting book. Moments of humor and laughter fill the pages of this book, and there is even a fun checklist for moms and paragraphs of wisdom in which a person can take away some good life lessons from it, like this one:

“Since that day, I’ve come to know the tone with which he spoke those words. David has a grudge-free and measured response to people he deems unreasonable—he shrugs them off. (I still have my learner’s permit in this practice, and too often the Nos of my critics swirl around in my mind, knocking me off-balance.)” – Page 26

Jennifer Grant writes a lovely story combining her past and present that everyone can relate to, laugh with, and find encouragement from, complete with the Cheerios and milk covering the front cover of the book. I give this book five Zwieback crackers.

*book given by publisher to review. The next two days I am hosting a blog tour complete with a sample chapter and a guest post. A special prize for new moms to be revealed on May 15.  Happy Mother’s Day!

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2 thoughts on “Book Review: MOMumental”

  1. What is a good parent? We moms often set impossible standards for ourselves, and feel that we can never be “a good mom.” Or at least a good enough mom. Momumental was so encouraging to me as a mom. Jennifer Grant offers solid advice, not just on parenting but on how to be intentional about building a family culture. She writes honestly about her own mistakes, her own perfectionism, and how her own family of origin impacted her. I’m recommending this book who anyone who is raising children—which is a messy but beautiful art.

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